CDI’s industry leadership has been propelled and sustained by continuous technical innovation. Our model leverages fleet project management using the latest digital tools and tailored processes as summarized below:

  • CDI is investing in state-of-the-art technologies such as special purpose robots and drones to access and dismantle structures in high radiation fields. This technology will support personnel with the goal to minimize crew dose and maximize personnel safety.
  • CDI seeks to advance safety through the application of Immersive Visualization Technology (IVT). IVT is a form of virtual reality used to improve safety within risky environments by enabling work process simulation and training before field activities begin.
  • CDI utilizes a real-time cloud-based communication network amongst geographically separated team members to ensure a controlled project execution and reinforce safety. The system allows project developments, lessons learned and process improvements to be shared across multiple sites as they are discovered.
  • Deconstruction planning for buildings is guided by their structural attributes simulated on a suitable computer code. Structural simulation models are used to identify and remove non-load bearing structures in the early phase of work. This effort allows the decommissioning team to de-clutter the building to facilitate the movement of personnel and material.
  • CDI’s processes for dismantling systems, structures and components have been chosen to minimize airborne particulate and the spread of contamination. 
  • CDI’s heavy load handling program is informed by Holtec’s decades-long running program that includes thousands of heavy load lifts at nuclear power plants with a flawless record of personnel safety and accident-free operations.
  • The design of lifting and handling equipment is guided by Holtec’s and SNC-Lavalin’s design approach that carefully considers safety, reliability, and efficiency all with an immaculate record of reliable performance over the past thirty plus years.  Equipment is designed to meet ANSI N14.6, FSAR requirements, and NUREG 0612 requirements, as applicable.
  • CDI’s ongoing development and licensing of casks to transport Class B, C and Greater Than Class C (GTCC) waste will give the company flexibility to ship a plant’s waste without dependency on third-party vendors. The suite of casks being developed to ship non-fissile waste by road, rail or sea, will help minimize radiation dose accrued from transport of the plant’s waste.     
  • CDI’s Quality Assurance Program is derived from Holtec’s Quality Assurance Program that meets 10CFR50 Appendix B, 10CFR71 Subpart H, 10CFR72 Subpart G, ASME Section III NCA-3800, and NQA-1. Holtec also maintains ISO 9001 accreditation, as well as various ASME certificates, including N, NPT, R, U, and NR. The completeness of Holtec’s QA program and its effectiveness has been subjected to audit by dozens of clients, regulators, and utility consortiums, such as the Nuclear Utilities Procurement Issues Committee (NUPIC).
  • CDI implements a customized site-specific Project Execution Plan (PEP) for each project. This approach to a PEP reinforces personnel safety and ALARA (as low as (is) reasonably achievable) goals by allowing managers to integrate unique site conditions during upfront project planning. 
  • CDI’s work control infrastructure is the body of operating procedures known as Decommissioning Standard Procedures (DSPs). DSPs have been distilled from the procedures used at the member plants in the fleet. The DSPs represent the synthesis of the knowledge developed in individual member nuclear plants and are a valuable intellectual property of the company.